A Century of Cookie Sales: Girl Scouts Debut New Flavor During Centennial Celebration


Garrett Cook, Star Local Media

Everyone, remain calm: Girl Scout cookie season is in session.

The beloved treats are on sale at places all over the place: Wal-Mart, video stores, car washes and restaurants. Their pitch is sweet, simple and hard to resist: “Would you like to buy some Girl Scout cookies?” There’s even an app for iOS and Android devices users can download to locate the nearest seller.

Amanda Duquette, vice president of marketing for Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas (GSNETX), said the cookies have become an in-demand part of our culture due to the good cause sales represent and their limited-time availability.

“These iconic treats have evolved over the years, but the community remains steadfast in its support of girls as they set their goals and run their own cookie business,” she said.

Speaking of evolution, Cookie-lovers are being treated to a new wrinkle in the same-old same-old this year: the new S’mores flavor that, according to Duquette, is “already flying off cookie booths across our council.” A celebration of a century of selling cookies, the Scouts decided to combine two Girl Scouts traditions: s’mores and Girl Scout cookies. Bakers take a graham cookie and double dip it in crème icing and finish it with a chocolate coating. Whether it can overtake the best-sellingThin Mints remains to be seen, but Duquette said troops across North Texas have already reported high sales of the new treat.

Of course, Girl Scout cookies are about more than just putting smiles on faces and calories in mouths. According to Duquette, Girl Scout troops receive a portion of funds from every box of cookies sold to use for programs, service projects, camping and other activities. The other portion of proceeds covers the cost of the product and girl incentives. Troops may also use the money earned to fund a project that will improve their community or may donate the money to a worthy cause.

Duquette said troops in the GSNETX earn an average of $1,079 through the sale of cookies. More than 16,000 Girl Scouts in the 32 counties that the council serves sold 3.2 million packages of cookies in 2016. All money generated through the Girl Scout Cookie Program in the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas Council stays in our local community, according to Duquette.

In the process, the Scouts are learning valuable life lessons through the world’s largest entrepreneurship program for girls, Duquette said.

“Through their cookie sales, girls are learning life and business skills,” she said. The Girl Scout cookie program is part of our financial literay focus in Girl Scouts – girls learn goal-setting, decision-making, money management, people skills and business ethics.”  

Read More!