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Girl Scouts Test BrainHealth Patch Program


2022_news_brainhealth

On June 14, a group of 15 Girl Scouts visited the Brain Performance Institute to test the BrainHealth patch program. One of the day's activities included a multimedia experience that explored how neurotransmitters influence moods and behavior. Another used a gameshow format to help girls discover ways brains help us think, feel, and react. The program, in partnership with The Center for BrainHeath, will begin this October. Highlights from three participating girls follows below:


Anaya: A Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas Cadette and involved seventh grader, Anaya is used to being on the go. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Anaya’s extracurricular and social activities were limited, leaving fewer opportunities for her to stay active and engaged. She was aware of the toll the effects of the pandemic took on her and her peers’ mental health.

When given the opportunity to participate in the Center for BrainHealth’s special patch program, Anaya knew it would be a good chance to learn more about importance of the brain and its effects on wellbeing. The program explored the importance of caring for your brain, and the principles of the Curious Brain, Creative Brain and Courageous Brain.

While she was somewhat familiar with the brain before taking part in the program, she was able to learn more about caring for her brain and was given tools to keep her mind healthy. Anaya says that one of the highlights of the program was learning more about the role of serotonin in the brain.

Anaya is excited about the knowledge she was able to glean from the program and encourages her friends and other Girl Scouts to participate in the Center for BrainHealth program to learn more as well.

 

Elizabeth: You’re never too young to learn about how to take care of your brain. Elizabeth – a Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas Brownie and incoming 4th grader – participated in the Center for BrainHealth’s patch program that explored brain health.

One of her favorite parts of the program was getting to make creative videos about the parts of the brain. Elizabeth’s group made a silly video called “Melatonin Madness.”

The girls also put together “brain boost” jars, which contain notes with helpful tips on how to take care of your brain, such as taking a brain break, reading a book, and eating healthy foods. Elizabeth says she plans to give the jar to a friend who wasn’t able to participate in the program.

Despite going into the program with little knowledge about brain heath, Elizabeth says has been talking about what she’s learned about the brain ever since.

 

Malia: As a Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas cadette and incoming 8th grader, Malia knew about the brain and mental health from school and her own experiences. However, that didn’t stop her from learning even more at the Center for BrainHealth’s Patch Program.

Through a series of hands-on activities, Malia discovered her unique brain powers, connected with others creatively, and took action to inspire her family, friends and communities to lead brain-healthy lives. She explored her five senses and how they affect the brain and created a video to discuss different parts of the brain.

Malia’s favorite part of the program was the mindful meditation. She found the experience relaxing and noticed how taking the time to meditate made her feel calm and refreshed. She learned how to meditate and what to do in certain situations to ensure she was practicing mindfulness – a skill she plans to use in her daily life.

An avid athlete, Malia thinks it’s important to learn about brain health to improve the mental aspect of your game. In a post-pandemic world, she thinks mental health matters even more and the patch program helps prepare you to know what to do in different situations.

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